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Frank Shostak

Tags Booms and BustsFinancial MarketsMoney and BanksBusiness CyclesCapital and Interest TheoryMoney and Banking

Works Published inQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics NewsletterMises Daily Article

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, master's degree from Witwatersrand University and PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University, and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

The Problem with Modern Monetary Theory

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog03/19/2019

MMT basically holds that governments have control of unlimited amounts of real wealth — thanks to money-printing power. But if this were really true, countries like the USSR and North Korea could simply create money until they became wealthy nations.

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Why Economics Needs Good Theory: Facts and Figures Aren't Enough

Blog03/09/2019

There's nothing wrong with consulting statistical data. But this data can only be properly understood if one first has a good grasp of sound theory.

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Why the Boom-Bust Cycle Keeps Repeating

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog03/04/2019

By creating money out of thin air, central banks repeatedly create bubble industries that must inevitably be liquidated.

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Government Spending Isn't Always Inflationary

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog02/23/2019

While government spending re-allocates and distorts resources, it is not necessarily inflationary. Inflation really just stems from money creation and fractional-reserve lending carryied out by central banks and private banks — thus creating money "out of thin air."

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The Problem with Cutting Taxes without Reducing Spending

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog02/15/2019

Like taxation, government spending diverts resources from real wealth-generating ventures. Borrowed funds for continued spending must also be repaid, so current spending translates to future taxation.

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