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William L. Anderson

Tags The EnvironmentMedia and CultureThe Police StateBusiness Cycles

Works Published inMises Daily ArticleQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsThe Free MarketAustrian Economics NewsletterSpeeches and Presentations

Bill Anderson is a professor of economics at Frostburg State University in Frostburg, Maryland. His Ph.D. in economics is from Auburn University, and he serves as an associate scholar with the Mises Institute. He has published numerous articles and papers on economics and political economy, including articles in The Independent Review, Reason Magazine, The Free Market, The Freeman, Public Choice, The American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, and others. He is also a frequent contributor to LewRockwell.com.

All Works

Murray Rothbard and the Deflation Bogey

Booms and BustsThe FedFinancial MarketsMonetary Theory

10/14/2017Mises Daily Articles
Contra the "experts," the economy really needs a strong bout of deflation to eradicate malinvestments and to permit the economy to have a real recovery.

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NCAA Violations Are Now Federal Crimes?

Legal SystemMonopoly and Competition

Blog10/02/2017
Apparently, it is now a federal criminal offense to break the rules of a private organization like the NCAA. Even when there's no victim.

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Why Police Cannot (and Will Not) Protect Our Rights

Bureaucracy and RegulationMonopoly and Competition

Blog09/11/2017
Police officers today see the rights of due process not as rights that police need to protect, but rather as barriers to “good police work.”

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The Google Manifesto – and What it Means

Bureaucracy and RegulationEntrepreneurship

Blog08/10/2017
Google can concentrate on innovation and profits — or it can focus on bureaucratic rules against thoughtcrimes. Google has apparently chosen the latter.

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Immunity for Prosecutors Encourages Fraud

Bureaucracy and RegulationLegal System

Blog07/18/2017
Prosecutorial immunity provides an incentive to government prosecutors to engage in fraud if it's good for their careers.

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